Flight Training

  • December 2015 Transitioning to a tailwheel airplane can be an enjoyable, satisfying challenge. But it can also be so frustrating you might wish to take up canoeing rather than continue with the training. In the end it will be worth the frustration and the challenge as you’ll become a much
  • A brief walk around Alaska's online aviation weather camera program. May 2015- A few months ago, the FAA announced the deployment of its all-new Aviation Weather Camera program. I was curious, so recently I took a look around the site—and I have to say, it's incredible. The design of the site
  • Aeronautical decision-making (ADM) is decision-making in a unique environment—aviation. It is a systematic approach to the mental process used by pilots to consistently determine the best course of action in response to a given set of circumstances. It is what a pilot intends to do based on the
  • Single-pilot light aircraft operations require good raining, sound procedures, excellent motor skills—and an awareness of our own cognitive bias. April 2015- Flying offers so many possibilities. As pilots we can pull our aircraft out of the hangar virtually anytime we want and sail to any
  • "If you're at 65 percent of power or so, 50 degrees rich of peak probably won't get you in trouble, and will give you close to maximum power for that manifold pressure and rpm. But the fact is that 50 degrees rich of peak will produce the absolute hottest possible temperatures for all parts of the
  • Important things to consider about multi-engine aircraft and training. March 2015- The multi-engine rating is often a step in the training progression for pilots that are considering a commercial flying career. But it's also an important step for single-engine General Aviation pilots. Often
  • From understanding splash lubrication to reduced braking action, winter flying is just... different. February 2015- Ready or not, winter is in full effect across the northern United States. Several important operational considerations will ensure you have a safe and enjoyable winter flying
  • March 2005 Back when the idea was first born a good number of years ago, the concepts known collectively as "cockpit resource management"—CRM, for those of you who enjoy acronyms—was suddenly the single-minded thought of government agencies and airline managements on how larger airplanes should
  • February 2005- There is no flying decision harder to make or more second-guessed than aborting a takeoff. It is the most time-critical choice you make in the pilot’s seat and it has some of the largest and most dire consequences if you get it
  • January 2015- Ugh. Here we go again.Every two years I ask myselfthe same question: What wouldmy idol, the venerable Lyn Freeman, do about my upcoming flight
  • December 2014- LOGBOOKS NEEDTO BE ACCURATEIN PERPETUITY. Our logs allow us to look back through the dust of years. We are prompted to remember special flights to places that were both exciting and new. The books may be fragile with age, or just a bit musty, and you'll note that the handwriting
  • October 2014- It was the first day of August. I was flying a pressurized twin to Canada as part of the sale to the new owner, and he was with me at 21,000 feet. We were picking our way through a line of weather. The radar and NEXRAD showed us a safe distance from any major
  • July 2014- I have one student who uses his plane to go from Palm Beach to Marsh Harbor every other week; another who goes to Asheville N.C., once a month or so. These owner pilots can certainly get there and get back—as long as everything goes normally. My role as a flight instructor is to make
  • November 2005- While I was changing his oil and filter recently, Bill, the talking 182, casually asked, “Why is it that you go to the lil’ red schoolhouse to learn how to fly jets and you never go there to learn how to fly me?” “Bill, that is an excellent question and I will see what I can do
  • November 2005- If you operate your aircraft into large busy airports, this comment from the tower controller has almost become a cliché. “Caution wake turbulence,” your trusty government employee will say. “You are six miles behind a heavy Boeing 777. Wind calm, cleared to land.” If you’ve been
  • October 2005- It is the mildest of weather conditions facing pilots, and yet it can be the most deadly. It creeps in on “little cat’s feet” but can make even the most expensive airliner or business jet go someplace else rather than face it. Like an in-law, it comes sometimes when it isn’t
  • September 2004 - After years of work, the FAA has finally issued a new rating category, targeted at lowering the cost of flying. Called the Sport Pilot Certificate, this new rating is specifically designed to work with a new class called Light Sport Aircraft. The Sport Pilot rating addresses the
  • Winter flying can be an enjoyable experience if you take the time to prepare for cold weather flight and exercise good judgment based on all available weather information. Winter operations will often mean that a decision must be made to go or not to go, that is based on all of your experience and