Family Trucksters: Cessna 205, 206 and 207

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The Cessna 205, 206, and 207, known primarily as the Stationair (and marketed variously as the Super Skywagon, Skywagon, and Super Skylane) are the heavy haulers of Cessna’s single-engine lineup. 

Cessna’s first six-seat single was basically a fixed-gear version of the popular Model 210. As Daryl Murphy, contributing editor emeritus and former Cessna marketing executive tells it, “…it became apparent to engineers that retrofitting the fuselage with fixed landing gear would permit the removal of the great hump they had to install in the rear cabin to house the main gear assembly and allow the addition of two more passenger seats.”

The prototype was subjected to extensive testing. More than 3,700 takeoffs and landings, and hundreds of hours of flight time proved the capabilities and handling characteristics of the new fixed-gear airframe.

Cessna’s first six-seat single was basically a fixed-gear version of the popular Model 210. As Daryl Murphy, contributing editor emeritus and former Cessna marketing executive tells it, “…it became apparent to engineers that retrofitting the fuselage with fixed landing gear would permit the removal of the great hump they had to install in the rear cabin to house the main gear assembly and allow the addition of two more passenger seats.”

The prototype was subjected to extensive testing. More than 3,739 takeoffs and landings, and hundreds of hours of flight time proved the capabilities and handling characteristics of the new fixed-gear airframe.

Cessna 205
The Cessna Model 205 is essentially a fixed-gear 210. Note the engine cowling bulge that was carried over from the 210.

Model 205

This new model was initially called the 210-5 and was certified June 14, 1962, under the 210’s Type Certificate Data Sheet (TCDS) 3A21. It was fitted with the 260 hp Continental IO-470-S engine from the 210B and hit the market for the 1963 model year as the Model 205. 

It could cruise at 163 mph and had a useful load of 1,550 pounds—an amount nearly equal to its empty weight of 1,750 pounds. The 205 retained the engine cowling bulge from its progenitor, originally where the 210 stowed its nosewheel on retraction.

It was an immediate success with more than 400 units sold in its first year on the market. The model 210-5A was certified July 19, 1963. 

Model 206

But as was typical of Cessna at the time, engineers immediately began tweaking the design. 

So many changes and improvements were made to the airframe that Cessna applied for a new TCDS. The new Model 206 was certified July 19, 1963. It sported a more powerful 285 hp Continental IO-520-A engine,  and a 42-inch cargo door. The cowling bulge was removed for a more streamlined look.

It debuted for the 1964 model year at $22,950. Customers appreciated the more powerful engine, along with the improved access and cargo door, and purchased 276 of the new 206s, with only 96 of the less expensive 205s selling that same year.

The 205 was discontinued with the 1965 model year, but the 206 would continue to be sold, with various improvements and changes, through 1984 when Cessna ceased its single-engine production. Production of the 206 was resumed in 1997 and the model continues to be sold today.

Model 207

In 1967, Cessna engineers went back – literally – to the drawing board to create a stretched version of the 206. 

Cessna 207
The 31¾ foot long fuselage of the 207 provided longitudinal stability and control.

They added 30 inches to the fuselage aft of the rear doorpost and extended the front baggage compartment by 18 inches forward of the firewall.

While the structure was beefed up throughout, costs were cut by splicing the added sections to the fuselage. Daryl Murphy describes the result as creating “decidedly awkward lines.”

The 207, powered by a 300 hp Continental IO-520-F engine, was certified Dec. 31, 1968, under TCDS A16CE.

William D. Thompson was also not an admirer of the looks of the 207. In his book, “Cessna: Wings for the World,” he wrote, “The 207 had, indeed, a crude looking fuselage that only an accountant could admire.”

Nevertheless and undoubtedly driven by its useful load of nearly one ton and seven-passenger capacity, the 207 sold 148 units in its first year of production. 

The 31¾ foot long fuselage provided longitudinal stability and control. 207 pilots have reported that the airframe is very forgiving CG-wise. 

Daryl Murphy noted that the 207 was a solid aircraft with a couple of exceptions: “About the only problems were vision over the 8 feet of cowling between the pilot and the prop, and keeping the airplane level while negotiating uneven spots on the taxiway—places you didn’t know existed until you taxied across them in the 207.”

788 of the Model 207 were produced before production ended in 1984.

The Stationair owners I’ve met over the years are ardent fans of their aircraft. With low production numbers and owners who tend to hang on to their aircraft, few become available for sale. 

Prices of used 206 models (no 205 or 207 models were available per my search) as of Dec. 8, 2019, showed a high price of $410,000 for a 2001 Turbo 206H amphibian and low of $117,500 for a 1965 P206. As Steve Ells once noted, “The main challenge, if you decide this airplane fits your needs, will be finding a good one.”

Are you a happy Cessna 205, 206, or 207 owner? Please share a photo and your story with me by emailing

Jennifer Dellenbusch is president of the Cessna Flyer Association. Send questions or comments to .

 

Model 205, 206 & 207 Variants

205 (Model 210-5)
Original 205 model, six seats, powered by a Continental IO-470-S of 260 hp, with a gross weight of 3,300 pounds landplane and certified June 14, 1962, as a variant of the Cessna 210. 
 
205A (Model 210-5A)
Six seats, powered by a Continental IO-470-S of 260 hp, with a gross weight of 3,300 pounds landplane and certified July 19, 1963, as a variant of the Cessna 210.
 
206
Original 206 model, six seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-A of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,300 pounds landplane, 3,500 pounds seaplane and certified July 19, 1963.
 
U206 Super Skywagon
First U206 model, six seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-A of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,300 pounds landplane, 3,500 pounds seaplane and certified Oct. 8, 1964.
 
P206
First P206 model, six seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-A of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,300 pounds landplane, 3,500 pounds seaplane and certified Oct. 8, 1964.
 
U206A
Six seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-A of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,500 pounds seaplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified Sept. 24, 1965.
 
P206A
Six seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-A of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,500 pounds seaplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified Sept. 24, 1965.
 
P206B
Six seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-A of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified Aug. 3, 1966.
 
TU206A
Six seats, powered by a turbocharged Continental TSIO-520-C of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,600 pounds seaplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified Dec. 20, 1965.
 
TU206B
Six seats, powered by a turbocharged Continental TSIO-520-C of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,600 pounds seaplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified Aug. 3, 1966.
 
TP206A
Six seats, powered by a turbocharged Continental TSIO-520-C of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,600 pounds seaplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified Dec. 20, 1965.
 
TP206B
Six seats, powered by a turbocharged Continental TSIO-520-C of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified Aug. 3, 1966.
 
U206B
Six seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-F of 300 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,500 pounds seaplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified Aug. 3, 1966.
 
P206C
Six seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-A of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified July 20, 1967.
 
TP206C
Six seats, powered by a turbocharged Continental TSIO-520-C of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified July 20, 1967.
 
P206D
Six seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-A of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified Sept. 18, 1968.
 
TP206D
Six seats, powered by a turbocharged Continental TSIO-520-C of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified Sept. 18, 1968.
 
P206E
Six seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-A of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified July 28, 1969.
 
TP206E
Six seats, powered by a turbocharged Continental TSIO-520-C of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified July 23, 1969.
 
U206C
Six seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-F of 300 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,500 pounds seaplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified July 20, 1967.
 
TU206C
Six seats, powered by a turbocharged Continental TSIO-520-C of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,600 pounds seaplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified July 20, 1967.
 
U206D
Six seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-F of 300 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,500 pounds seaplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified Sept. 18, 1968.
 
TU206D
Six seats, powered by a turbocharged Continental TSIO-520-C of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,600 pounds seaplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified Sept. 18, 1968.
 
U206E
Six seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-F of 300 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,500 pounds seaplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified July 28, 1969.
 
TU206E
Six seats, powered by a turbocharged Continental TSIO-520-C of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,600 pounds seaplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified July 28, 1969.
 
U206F
Six seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-F of 300 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,500 pounds seaplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified Oct. 26, 1971.
 
TU206F
Six seats, powered by a turbocharged Continental TSIO-520-C of 285 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,600 pounds seaplane, 3,300 pounds skiplane and certified Oct. 26, 1971.
 
U206G
Six seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-F of 300 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,500 pounds seaplane and certified June 21, 1976.
 
TU206G
Six seats, powered by a turbocharged Continental TSIO-520-M of 310 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane, 3,600 pounds seaplane, 3,600 pounds amphibian and certified June 21, 1976.
 
206H
Six seats, powered by a Lycoming IO-540-AC1A5 of 300 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane and certified Nov. 26, 1997.
 
T206H
Six seats, powered by a turbocharged Lycoming TIO-540-AJ1A of 310 hp, with a gross weight of 3,600 pounds landplane and certified Oct. 1, 1998.
 
207 Skywagon
Original 207 model, seven seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-F of 300 hp, with a gross weight of 3,800 pounds landplane and certified Dec. 31, 1968.
 
T207 Turbo Skywagon
Seven seats, powered by a turbocharged Continental TSIO-520-G of 300 hp, with a gross weight of 3,800 pounds landplane and certified Dec. 31, 1968.
 
207A Skywagon/Stationair 8
Seven seats, powered by a Continental IO-520-F of 300 hp, with a gross weight of 3,800 pounds landplane and certified July 12, 1976. Certified for eight seats Sept. 11, 1979.
 
T207A Turbo Skywagon/Turbo Stationair 8
Seven seats, powered by a turbocharged Continental TSIO-520-M of 310 hp, with a gross weight of 3,800 pounds landplane and certified July 12, 1976. Certified for eight seats Sept. 11, 1979.